Q & A

                                               

  1.     How does fitness impact life expectancy and quality of life?


            A lack of exercise during adult life is associated with deconditioning, fatigue, weakness, decrease in       

          one's physical and mental health and well-being, the onset of disease, loss of self-esteem and
          self-efficacy, and an increase in depression and anxiety.  The one intervention proposed to have the
          most preventative and therapeutic impact on these age-related changes is physical activity.  
          For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
          http://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20folder/age.html

 

 

     2.     What are some of the more common medical conditions associated with aging and how does regular exercise help?


           Dementia, depression and chronic medical conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, cardiovascular disease,

           musculoskeletal disorders, hypertension, dyslipidemia, COPD, and strokes are common with aging.

           By improving physical and mental function, and contributing to a sense of wellbeing, fitness programs can

           help prevent or manage chronic conditions.
           For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
           ©2014 NASM National Academy of Sports Medicine: Senior Fitness Specialist Manual

 


    3.    What are the Physiological and Anatomical considerations of Aging?

            Several physiological and anatomical changes occur within the human body as individual’s age and can

           impact the nervous, musculoskeletal, and cardio respiratory systems.  Physical activity performance diminishes,

           such as in sport, exercise, and general daily activities, and increases the risk for injury during physical activity

           or exercise. While many physical changes are inevitable, habitual participation in physical activity, structured

           exercise, and safe and effective fitness programs can prevent and reduce the effect of changes or injury.         
           For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com

           ©2014 NASM National Academy of Sports Medicine. Senior Fitness Specialist Manual

 


    4.    What are some of the reasons preventing older adults from exercising?

             Although the reasons are complex and varied research shows that motivation and education are the two

            most important factors. Other reasoning includes attitude, self-efficacy, discomfort, disability, fear of injury,

            lack of access to senior specific fitness professionals and or fitness facilities. There are also several myths that

            surround fitness and the aging process.
            For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
            http://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0201/p419.html

 


    5.    Why is getting seniors to understand the importance of committing to regular exercise so challenging?

            Although exercise and physical activity are among the healthiest things you can do for yourself, some older

            adults are reluctant to exercise. Some are afraid that exercise will be too hard or that physical activity will

            harm them. Others might think they have to join a gym or have special equipment. For the most part, when older

            people lose their ability to do things on their own, it doesn't happen just because they've aged. It's usually

            because they're not active.
            For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
            http://nihseniorhealth.gov/exerciseforolderadults/healthbenefits/01.html

 


    6.    What type and duration of exercise is recommended for older adults?

             If you are 65 years of age or older, are generally fit, and have no limiting health conditions you can follow the

            guidelines listed here: Older adults need at least: 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity

            (i.e., brisk walking) every week and muscle strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major

            muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms) or 1 hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes)

            of vigorous intensity aerobic activity (i.e., jogging or running) every week and muscle strengthening activities on

            2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms)

            or an equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous intensity  aerobic activity and muscle strengthening activities on

            2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

            The good news is that you can spread your activity out during the week, so you don't have to do it all at once.

            You can even break it up into smaller chunks of time during the day. It's about what works best for you, as long as

            you're doing physical activity at a moderate or vigorous effort for at least 10 minutes at a time.
            For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com    
            (
http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/glossary/index.htm#muscle-strength)
            (
http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/glossary/index.htm#muscle-strength)                  

            (http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/glossary/index.htm#muscle-strength)                    

            (http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/older_adults/index.htm)


     7.    What are the main elements of fitness training for seniors?

             The main elements of fitness for older adults are exercises that help to maintain strength (resistance training),

             balance, core, flexibility, and promote cardiovascular health (aerobic training).
             For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com



     8.    What are the top reasons older adults can consider when investing in a personal trainer?
    
              Some of the top reasons include motivation, education, consistency, individualized instruction and safe effective

              fitness programs.
             For more information and a complete list contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit

             www.futureofseniorfitness.com
 


     9.    What are some of the important exercise safety guidelines for older adults?

              Safe and effective exercise programs are the number one priority for everyone, especially older adults.

             Some of the top guidelines include, checking with a doctor before beginning a fitness program, selecting

             certified fitness professionals with quality credentials, using good posture and form, and slowing down the     

             movements.
             For more information and a complete list contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit

             www.futureofseniorfitness.com
 


    10.     What percentage of the US Senior population exercises on a regular basis?

               Less than 5% of adults participate in 30 minutes of physical activity each day; only one in three adults receive

              the recommended amount of physical activity each week. Only 35-44% of adults 75 years or older are physically

              active, and 28-34% of adults ages 65-74 are physically active.  More than 80% of adults do not meet the

              guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities.

              For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit www.futureofseniorfitness.com

              http://www.fitness.gov/resource-center/facts-and-statistics/
 


     11.    What percentage of baby boomers expects to exercise more in retirement?

               54% of baby boomers expect to exercise regularly in retirement, 68% agree that they will have plenty of time

              for recreation.  Unfortunately, statistics show that more than 80% do not meet the recommended guidelines

              for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities.
             For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
             http://www.icaa.cc/business/whitepapers/icaabusinesscase-wp.pdf


 

     12.    Why is it never too late to start exercising?
    
                Growing older doesn’t mean you have to lose strength or the ability to do everyday tasks. Exercise can help

               older adults feel better and enjoy life more, even those who think that they are too old or out of shape.

               A new study published recently in the British Journal of Sports Medicine finds a direct link between the

               likelihood of healthy aging and the amount of exercise older people take - even if they only started being

               physically active around retirement age, they enjoyed significantly better health than their inactive peers.

              At the end of the study they ranked participants according to overall health and found that the top 19% fell

              into the “healthy agers” category. Healthy agers were defined as "those participants who survived without

              developing major chronic disease, depressive symptoms, physical or cognitive impairment."
              For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com    
             
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/269326.php

 


     13.    What are some of the future trends in fitness for older adults?

                With a growing population of senior citizens we see that fitness programs for older adults are holding strong

               in the middle of the trends. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), Health Fitness Journal, and

               2016 Fitness Trends has fitness programs for older adults ranked #8. Personal Training is ranked at #6 and

               Group Personal Training at #11. The concern for the health of aging older adults has consistently been high

               in the top 20 since 2014. As a result, commercial and community based organizations see future trends include

               more rigorous exercise programs, along with strength training and team sports. Technological and scientific

               advancements will create more advantages for senior citizens. There will also be more wellness programs and

               social support services that will contain quality activities.
               For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
               www.acsm-healthfitness.org

 


     14.    What is the definition of aging?

                Aging defies easy definition, at least in biological terms. Aging is not just the passage of time, but rather an

               accumulation of biological events that occur over a span of time.  If we define aging as the loss of one's ability

               to adapt to a changing environment, then biological or functional age becomes a measure of one's success for

               adaptation.  At the turn of the twentieth century, approximately four percent of the United States population

               was over age 65; today, it has climbed to 13%. Life expectancy at birth in the U.S. has increased to about

               76 years today, and is expected to reach 83 years by 2050. The absolute number of older persons, currently

               about 36 million, has increased 11-fold, compared to only triple in the entire U.S. population. As individuals

               age, especially past 85 years, there is a growing need for assistance with everyday activities; half that group

               needs some assistance. Thus, as individuals live longer, we must determine the extent and mechanisms by which

               exercise and physical activity can improve health, functional capacity, quality of life, and functional

               independence.
               For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com



     15.   What is the future demographic trend for aging in the US and Hawaii versus the US?

                 Population aging is largely caused by two demographic trends.  People today are living longer than before and

                a less obvious cause of population aging is a decline in the birth rate.  Estimates project that by the year 2030

                there will be more than 70 million people age 65+ occupying the United States. Hawaii’s elderly population is

                estimated to exceed the percentage of older adults as a total of the population by over 5%, versus the U.S. with

                Hawaii county leading the way, Honolulu and Maui not far behind and Kauai with the least percentage.
                For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK148831/

                ©2014 NASM National Academy of Sports Medicine: Senior Fitness Specialist Manual


     16.   What is considered wellness for the aging population?

                Evolving research shows that physical, intellectual, social, vocational, emotional and spiritual activity wellness

               is the key to aging people keeping their health, their mental skills and their quality of life. Wellness is the global

               term covering all the activities and many of the physical amenities that are offered in a community.
               For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
               http://www.icaa.cc/business/whitepapers/icaabusinesscase-wp.pdf


 

     17.   What are the top causes of death in the US among older adults and how can exercise influence these statistics?

                The top causes of death are heart disease, cancer, stroke, pulmonary disease, Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.

               These afflictions are less likely to occur to individuals who choose healthy lifestyles, including good nutrition

               and exercise.
               For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com

               ©2014 NASM National Academy of Sports Medicine: Senior Fitness Specialist Manual


     18.    How can exercise help manage the cost of healthcare in the coming years?

                 As a person ages, there is a comparable increase in the risks of disability, dementia, depression and chronic

                medical conditions (arthritis, diabetes, cardiovascular disease).  Today, about 80% of older US adults have at

                least one chronic condition, and 50% have at least two. Chronic diseases are associated with disability,

                diminished quality of life, and increased costs for healthcare and long-term care.  By improving physical and

                mental function, and contributing to a sense of wellbeing, fitness programs can help prevent or manage chronic

                conditions.  This lowers the costs for individuals, who retain more of their personal wealth, and lowers costs

                for the community because there is lessened need for care staff.
 

                   An investment of $1 in physical activity (time and equipment) leads to $3.20 in medical cost savings.

                    WHO/CDC Collaborating Center on Physical Activity and Health Promotion

                
•   Every dollar spent on physical activity programs for older adults with hip fractures result $4.50 return.
                    US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

                 •  People who were 50 years and older and started exercising only 90 minutes a week saved an average of

                    $2,200 per year in medical costs.
                    HealthPartners Research Foundation
                For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
                http://www.icaa.cc/business/whitepapers/icaabusinesscase-wp.pdf
 
 

     19.    Is declining health as we age inevitable?

                 People are living longer.  In 1970, the average life expectancy at birth in the United States was 70.8 years;

                in 2008, it was 78.0 years; and by 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau projects life expectancy will reach 79.5 years.

                Views on aging are also changing.  Disease and disability were once considered an inevitable part of growing

                older, but that is no longer true.  While aging does put us at greater risk for health issues, many older adults

                can be healthy and active well into their advancing years.  We already know, for example, that healthy

                nutrition, exercise and physical activity can help promote healthy aging; however, it’s not just the idea of

                failing to be active and thus losing the benefits of exercise.  Instead, the issue that seems critical is that reduced

                activity levels across the lifespan is itself a risk factor for many health morbidities.                                             

                For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit www.futureofseniorfitness.com

                https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/black-belt-brain/201502/is-declining-ability-aging-inevitable

 

     20.    Why is Diabetes underreported as the under lying cause of death on death certificates?

                Studies have found that only about 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had diabetes listed anywhere

                on the death certificate and about 10% to 15% had it listed as the underlying cause of death.  Deaths from

                diabetic complications are the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Complications from diabetes

                that can lead to death are heart disease and stroke, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-limb amputation, nerve

                disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, periodontal (gum) disease, depression, cancer, and complications of

                pregnancy, among others.
                For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
                http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/statsreport14/national-diabetes-report-web.pdf



     21.   Why is exercise the most important non-dietary factor in regulating Diabetes?

                When you exercise, your muscles use sugar (glucose) for energy. Regular physical activity also helps your body

                use insulin more efficiently. These factors work together to lower your blood sugar level. The more strenuous

                your workout, the longer the effect lasts. But even light activities — such as housework, gardening or being on

                your feet for extended periods — can improve your blood sugar level.
               For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
               http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-management/art-20047963


 

     22.   What impact does aging have on nutritional requirements?

                 A decrease in physical activity and the loss of lean body mass lowers the daily caloric requirements for older

                adults. Estimated calorie requirements takes into account a 5% reduction in calorie expenditure per decade. 

                Changes in the digestive and cardiovascular systems, kidney function, and sensory perception accompany the

                normal aging process and effect nutritional status and requirements.  A decline in functional capacity, physical

                activity, and the loss of skeletal muscle reduces daily energy needs, yet many nutrients are required in the same

                or higher amounts.
                For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
                ©2014 NASM National Academy of Sports Medicine: Senior Fitness Specialist Manual

 

     23.   Why being disabled shouldn’t stop older adults from exercise?

                 A disability can make exercise challenging.   There are ways to modify exercises to work around disabilities,

                but there really is no excuse for not doing some sort of exercise.  If you’re in a wheelchair, you can use your   

                arms to get an aerobic workout and build strength.   Even people who are bedridden can find ways to exercise.
                For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com


 

     24.   How can exercise help joints and osteoarthritis?

                Studies show that exercising helps with arthritis pain.   One study of people over age 60 with knee arthritis

                found that those who exercised more had less pain and better joint function.
                For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com
    
               
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/review-confirms-exercise-eases-knee-osteoarthritis/article26687124/

 

     25.   What are some of the top healthy tips for older adults?

               Many older adults live active and healthy lives, but as we age our bodies and minds change.  

              There are things that can be done to remain healthy and fit; keep active, eat well, socialize, prevent falls,

              and boost brain power.                                                                                  
              For more information contact Myles Dias Fitness Hawaii, LLC, visit
www.futureofseniorfitness.com